Complacency

This week, Mark and I watched the movie “The Cove.”  It was an incredibly eye-opening documentary about dolphins and what is happening to them in a town in Japan.  Every year, from March to September, thousands of dolphins are forced into this particular cove where (with the exception of the few that are sold to aquariums and “sea” parks) they are slaughtered.   Not only is it horrifying that they are killed at all, but they are also sold in fish markets for consumption.  In some cases the meat is purchased by people who know they will be eating dolphin, but in other instances it is labeled as fish such as Tuna.  And if that is not enough, the levels of mercury that are found in dolphin meat is off the charts.  It is a tragedy at many levels and for the most part people don’t know or don’t care that it is happening.

When the movie was over, I was all fired up.  I wanted to DO something.  The thought that followed that passionate feeling was yes, but are you going to do something this time? It was then that I was made ever aware of my own complacency.  I’ve watched many of these types of documentaries and it is always followed by that same feeling.  Initially, I want to change and make a difference, but rarely do I follow through.  I’ve watched movies like “Food Inc.” and “The Future of Food” and inwardly vowed to buy fresh food from the co-op or farmer’s market.  Always it is short-lived.  Lack of time coupled with mine and my family’s pickyness always seems to get the better of me, despite the frightening realities of the food industry.  I have made changes over the years, but there is still so much I know that I choose to ignore because it is simply easier to do so.

Today at church the theme of the service was “the courage to change.”  The guest speaker talked about the book “Ask Yourself This” and the various questions it challenges the reader to pose to themselves.  Part of the inward interrogation involves taking a look at what we are resisting.  For me, complacency is just another way that I avoid rocking the boat.  If I just nod my head and smile, I don’t have to face criticism.  Complacency is a way that the lazy side of me wins.  Assuming that the government and corporations only have my best interest at heart is much easier than taking the extra time, energy, and money to research and buy only the safest products for my family.

I want to step out of the comfort zone that is complacency and do something when I feel drawn to do it.  It only takes small steps to make a difference, and I want to take more of those steps.  Over the past couple of weeks I have been so inspired by a friend named Jenny (@IHavDefx) that I met through Twitter and this blog.  She was touched by the story of a family dealing with childhood cancer and instead of being complacent she decided to do something.  She signed up to participate in a charity fund-raising event, tweeted about it, and blogged about it.  Within a few weeks, Jenny raised $1500 for the Nevada Childhood Cancer Foundation.  She sent me a message the other day telling me that to honor a friend who was diagnosed with MS, she is going to run in a half-marathon that will raise money for research to find a cure.  So despite the fact that Jenny tells me I inspire her, she is the one who has become an inspiration to me.

It is time for me to get off my complacent ass…I’ll start by telling everyone to watch The Cove.  (If it helps, I just found out it won the academy award for best documentary.) Also, want to link up to Mama Kat’s blog post about The Cove, it’s excellent.  Read it here.

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